Evil Thoughts

Here’s what I’ve run across lately:

(1)

From Charles Bellinger’s essay, “The Joker Is Satan, and So Are We: Girard and The Dark Knight”:

“When The Joker says “the only sensible way to live in this world is without rules” he is speaking the voice of chaotic, Dionysian violence. But he also reveals in this scene that the “rules,” the laws and prohibitions that society invents to contain violence, are a sham. The police and the legal system think of themselves as stemming from a different spiritual source than the demonic criminals; but in reality they all flow out of the fountain of the complex, shapeshifting satanic event. The violence of the criminals and the brutality of the police, symbolized by Batman slamming the Joker’s head into the table, reveal that the ultimate basis of violence is reciprocity. The enemies who attack each other come to resemble each other more and more until they are indistinguishable.”

(2)

From Dave Cullen’s article in Slate (2004), “The Depressive and the Psychopath: At last we know why the Columbine killers did it”:

Columbine shooter Eric Harris is described as a psychopath, with a

“pattern of grandiosity, glibness, contempt, lack of empathy, and superiority. … Because psychopaths are guided by such a different thought process than non-psychopathic humans, we tend to find their behavior inexplicable. But they’re actually much easier to predict than the rest of us once you understand them. Psychopaths follow much stricter behavior patterns than the rest of us because they are unfettered by conscience, living solely for their own aggrandizement.”

(3)

From Helene Tursten’s crime novel, The Glass Devil (2003; transl. English 2007):

“‘At first you think it’s totally incomprehensible, how people can devote themselves to Satan-worship and strange rituals. Then, in some way … you wonder what makes these people tick.

“‘What is it that makes them tick then?’

“‘Power. They want power over other people and power to accept themselves. According to [Anton] LaVey, nothing limits you more than yourself and your own conscience, until you realize that no one else is allowed to make decisions about you. … Satanism gives people permission to live out forbidden desires. … You dare to let Satan loose inside you. The figure of God in different religions often has a law-giving role. That’s not the case in Satanism. …'”

“‘”I” is the secret word,’ she said.”

“‘And complete satisfaction of one’s own desires. I can trace Satanism in most of the crimes we investigate. … Most crimes are about satisfactions of one’s own needs. Money, sex, power or as a way of finding an outlet for one’s anger. .. Maybe some of us have more of Satan inside than others.'”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s